The 25TH Amendment and Its Importance

Published August 17, 2017 by Angela

I have come to the realization that my silence may be construed as agreement, consensus, and support of things I have never, could never, and will never believe in. I get that this is a hot topic right now, and my one voice will be lost in the crowd of millions who feel similar. But I must speak it, or forever feel guilty for not standing up for what is right, and good, about this country.

And stand up to those who are so very wrong, and confused, and twisting rules and laws as they see fit, in order to fulfill their agenda. There is only one agenda for this one side. Hate. Pure, unfiltered, in-your-face, HATE.

When my 25 year old daughter tells me that when she goes out in public with her African-American fiancé, whom is the most wonderful young man I could ever hope for her to be marrying in less than two months, she is afraid of getting shot.

Afraid of getting SHOT. My heart broke right then and there, sitting on my front porch steps with her.

They get looks, they get remarks, they get ignored at restaurants because no one will serve them. She fears for her fiancé who has been stopped for driving while black, in a nice vehicle, in a nice neighborhood, because they both have very successful careers and are financially responsible and comfortable. They have opted to not go out to certain events due to where it was being held, and when it would be ending: late at night.

My beautiful, amazing daughter is living in fear in a country where the “president-of-the-united-states” will not say Nazi’s are bad people.

Who says there are good white supremacists. That is not even a possible thing. It is NOT possible to be a white supremacist, and be a good person.

Yes; I intentionally did not capitalize one single word of the above title of the leader of this nation because he is not worthy of that title, and this country never deserved to be burdened with this kind of leader.

I did not see this coming as I have had and raised four daughters.

I am done with my rant; but below you will find a very important section of the 25th amendment of the United States of America. I do not know how, or who can get this ball rolling, but this amendment needs to be put to use now, right now, before we lose even more.

Section 4 addresses the dramatic case of a President who may be unable to fulfill his constitutional role but who cannot or will not step aside. It provides both a decision-maker and a procedure. The initial deciding group is the Vice President and a majority of either the Cabinet or some other body that Congress may designate (though Congress has never done so). If this group declares a President “unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office,” the Vice President immediately becomes Acting President. If and when the President pronounces himself able, the deciding group has four days to disagree. If it does not, the President retakes his powers. But if it does, the Vice President keeps control while Congress quickly meets and makes a decision. The voting rule in these contested cases favors the President; the Vice President continues acting as President only if two-thirds majorities of both chambers agree that the President is unable to serve.

Section 3 and (especially) Section 4 are long and complicated by constitutional standards. Nevertheless, they leave a number of issues unsettled—most significantly, what counts as presidential “inability.” At the Constitutional Convention in 1787, delegate John Dickinson asked, “What is the extent of the term ‘disability’” in the proposed presidential succession clause, “and who is to be the judge of it?” No response is recorded. By giving the President, Vice President, and Congress important and distinct roles, the Framers of the Twenty-Fifth Amendment went a long way toward answering the second part of Dickinson’s question, rather than try to resolve the first part.

Accessed at: The 25th Amendment

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3 comments on “The 25TH Amendment and Its Importance

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